William DeShazer

Film, Unseen, Archives, or Just Because

The Mississippi River Kings

dallasmorningnews:

Instagram friend @micahdmoore took this photo of the front of our building on Young and Houston streets in downtown Dallas. It’s our favorite quote by longtime publisher George Bannerman Dealey:
Build the news upon the rock of truth and righteousnes.
Conduct it always upon the lines of fairness and integrity.
Acknowledge the right of the people to get from the newspaper both sides of every important question.

dallasmorningnews:

Instagram friend @micahdmoore took this photo of the front of our building on Young and Houston streets in downtown Dallas. It’s our favorite quote by longtime publisher George Bannerman Dealey:

Build the news upon the rock of truth and righteousnes.

Conduct it always upon the lines of fairness and integrity.

Acknowledge the right of the people to get from the newspaper both sides of every important question.

amypowell:

It has been a wild week having my photography featured by Phil Bicker at TIME.  Big hugs and thanks to everyone who has shared my work and sent supportive messages my way.  It’s been awesome.  

To my surprise, my brothers are jealous they’re not in the pictures.  Clearly, I have some more work to do!  

Feeling the love…

amypowell:

It has been a wild week having my photography featured by Phil Bicker at TIME. Big hugs and thanks to everyone who has shared my work and sent supportive messages my way. It’s been awesome.

To my surprise, my brothers are jealous they’re not in the pictures. Clearly, I have some more work to do!

Feeling the love…

(via tristanhutchinson)

benjaminrasmussen:

In Tristan Spinski’s new project, Mr. Sczelepinski, he explores who his father was through the objects that represented him. It is one of the most moving bodies of work that I have seen in a long time. 

benjaminrasmussen:

In Tristan Spinski’s new project, Mr. Sczelepinski, he explores who his father was through the objects that represented him. It is one of the most moving bodies of work that I have seen in a long time. 

danielshea:

I wrote about Lucas Foglia’s new book Frontcountry for photo-eye and also did an interview with him. We’re continuing a dialog we’ve been having for a few years now about documentary intention, photography and politics. Congrats to Lucas on a beautiful new monograph.

DS:     In this book, and definitely in A Natural Order, there is a pervading sense of violence and sexuality, the two often occurring simultaneously (the origin of life, the fate of death, pain and pleasure?). Your subjects are often drenched in deeply psychological offerings for your audience. Is this totally conscious on your part? LF:     The expressions of the people I photograph come from the situations I photograph in, situations that I am a part of. Tom and Donnie, for instance, were looking at each other arguing about who would remove the rope from the cow’s horn. The soccer players are engrossed in a moment waiting for a ball. Stacy was looking at me. I think any expression that is honest is ambiguous, made up of mixed emotions.When a forest fire started burning outside of town, George’s daughter asked me to keep him company. George raised cattle for most of his life. In his retirement he enjoys chasing wildfires. We drove on dirt roads with dust coming up through the floor of his truck, and then stopped at the hill with the fire burning on the other side. In the photograph, the fire cloud arcs over both of us. It reminds me of how immense and uncontrollable that landscape is, and of how thrilled and vulnerable I feel in it. 

danielshea:

I wrote about Lucas Foglia’s new book Frontcountry for photo-eye and also did an interview with him. We’re continuing a dialog we’ve been having for a few years now about documentary intention, photography and politics. Congrats to Lucas on a beautiful new monograph.

DS:     In this book, and definitely in A Natural Order, there is a pervading sense of violence and sexuality, the two often occurring simultaneously (the origin of life, the fate of death, pain and pleasure?). Your subjects are often drenched in deeply psychological offerings for your audience. Is this totally conscious on your part? 

LF:     The expressions of the people I photograph come from the situations I photograph in, situations that I am a part of. Tom and Donnie, for instance, were looking at each other arguing about who would remove the rope from the cow’s horn. The soccer players are engrossed in a moment waiting for a ball. Stacy was looking at me. I think any expression that is honest is ambiguous, made up of mixed emotions.

When a forest fire started burning outside of town, George’s daughter asked me to keep him company. George raised cattle for most of his life. In his retirement he enjoys chasing wildfires. We drove on dirt roads with dust coming up through the floor of his truck, and then stopped at the hill with the fire burning on the other side. In the photograph, the fire cloud arcs over both of us. It reminds me of how immense and uncontrollable that landscape is, and of how thrilled and vulnerable I feel in it. 

(via tristanhutchinson)

earnestine and hazel’s

earnestine and hazel’s

mikebelleme:

Ean Houghs for a new portrait section in Asheville Citizen Times that features one photo per Friday of each month of one photographer per month. Ean, 10 is bravely battling leukemia and I decided to photograph him and his family in three instalments that will appear in the coming weeks. Here’s his interview conducted by his mom, Melissa and some more on his story: 
Read the article.

mikebelleme:

Ean Houghs for a new portrait section in Asheville Citizen Times that features one photo per Friday of each month of one photographer per month. Ean, 10 is bravely battling leukemia and I decided to photograph him and his family in three instalments that will appear in the coming weeks. Here’s his interview conducted by his mom, Melissa and some more on his story: 

Read the article.

(via lovebryan)

My jam today.

Driving home

Driving home